Lynn LeCorre
Artist and Art Educator

Blog

(posted on 25 Sep 2014)

Well it's the first day of fall today, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. But that doesn't mean we still can't enjoy good veggies! These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week. Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics! Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with! Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets

and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush! Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo!

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves. But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients
.

Photo: WEEK 2 - BLOG CHALLENGE - Beets!

Well it's the first day of fall today, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. But that doesn't mean we still can't enjoy good veggies! These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store. 

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week.  Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics!  Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with!  Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush!  Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo! 

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

Share your recipes on Facebook, or email them to me and I can share them too!

This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves.  But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients.

Spinach, pear and beet salad

This is my new favorite salad with roasted beets.  Of course you can just roast the beets and eat them separately for a quick, simple addition.  *Also for extra nutrients, add the beet leaves into your salad -if the leaves are fresh and not too tough.  

Salad:
3 medium golden or red beets, trimmed
6 cups baby spinach leaves (1 bunch) OR any mixed greens including beet tops.
3 ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears, peeled, cored and cut into thick slices
1/3 cup dried cranberries

Dressing:
1 cup peeled, cored, and diced ripe Barlett or Bosc pears (1-2)
1/3 cup dry sherry
¼ cup olive oil
2 TBSP freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 small shallot
1 TSP gluten-free Dijon mustard 
1 TSP date syrup or honey
¼ TSP sea salt
1/8 TSP black pepper

Prepare the beets:
Pre-heat the oven to 425 F. Wrap beets in tinfoil, enclosing them completely. Roast the beets for 1 hour and 15 min. or until tender when pierced with a fork.  Allow the beets to cool completely (about 1 hour).  Using a sharp knife, peel the beets and slice them.

Dressing:
Combine the diced pear, sherry, olive oil, lemon juice, shallot, mustard, honey and salt and pepper in a blender and puree until smooth. 

Assemble salad:
Place the spinach (or mixed greens) and cranberries in a large bowl. Pour the dressing over the greens and toss to coat.  Divide the greens equally among 4-6 plates, then, arrange the beet slices and pear slices on top of the greens.
NOTE:  If you add the beets and pears before tossing the salad, the pears will turn pink from the beets!

Nutritional Value:
Spinach: Vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium and zinc.
Pears: Vitamin C, potassium, magnesium and iron.
Beets: Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, sodium. Golden Beets, chalk pastel on paper.

Spinach, pear and beet salad.docx


This is my new favorite salad with roasted beets. Of course you can just roast the beets and eat them separately for a quick, simple addition. *Also for extra nutrients, add the beet leaves into your salad -if the leaves are fresh and not too tough.

Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf

Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf

WEEK 2 - BLOG CHALLENGE - Beets!


Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week. Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics! Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with! Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush! Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo!

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

Share your recipes on Facebook, or email them to me and I can share them too!

Golden Beets, chalk pastels.


This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves. But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf

WEEK 2 - BLOG CHALLENGE - Beets!


Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week. Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics! Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with! Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush! Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo!

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

Share your recipes on Facebook, or email them to me and I can share them too!

Golden Beets, chalk pastels.


This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves. But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf

WEEK 2 - BLOG CHALLENGE - Beets!


Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week. Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics! Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with! Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush! Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo!

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

Share your recipes on Facebook, or email them to me and I can share them too!

Golden Beets, chalk pastels.


This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves. But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf

WEEK 2 - BLOG CHALLENGE - Beets!


Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week. Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics! Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with! Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush! Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo!

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

Share your recipes on Facebook, or email them to me and I can share them too!

Golden Beets, chalk pastels.


This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves. But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf

WEEK 2 - BLOG CHALLENGE - Beets!


Well it's the first day of fall, and the seasonal harvest of fresh garden veggies is coming to an end. These golden beets were from my garden, but you can buy red or golden beets from the grocery store.

Dark, leafy greens, including beet leaves, are the best sources of vitamin K. This vitamin is needed to make proteins that stop bleeding by clotting blood. You also need vitamin K to keep your bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Your body uses Vitamin K to make another group of proteins that regulate bone mineralization. One cup of fresh beet greens contains 152 micrograms of vitamin K, which is well over 100 percent of your recommended daily intake. When the greens are cooked, 1 cup has 590 percent of your daily intake. Cooking the greens reduces the moisture content, and concentrates the nutrients in the same size portion.

How to get started...
1) Introduce red or golden beets into your diet this week. Use the recipe below or find your own. The easiest way is to eat them is to roast them in the oven or on the BBQ. See notes in recipe.

2) Be creative with the beets and their leaves. Beet juice has a potent dye colour and is often used in for naturally dying fabrics! Maybe you want to try using the beet juice to paint with! Slice some cooked (and cooled) red beets and stamp the sliced beets onto some paper to transfer the juice. Stamp a picture or use the beet as a paint brush! Or just slice and chop the raw beets and leaves and arrange them into a picture and take a photo!

Keep it simple and have fun and submit your 'creations' to me at lynnldallaire@gmail.com so I can track your progress for your prize!

Share your recipes on Facebook, or email them to me and I can share them too!

Golden Beets, chalk pastels.


This drawing took longer than I set aside time for, due to all the leaves. But a drawing of the full plant, looked so beautiful and it was fun getting visually lost in the overlapping leaves. Also, this is one plant in which you can eat the whole plant - root and leaves - both are filled with nutrients and phytonutrients.

- See more at: http://lynn-lecorre-dallaire.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog-challenge#sthash.LWWeII8F.dpuf